Bachelor and Master Theses

General

The Kaiser chair supervises bachelor and master theses. Usually, the thesis will cover aspects of ongoing research projects. Many of our research projects cover topics such as Entrepreneurship, Industrial Economics, Personnel Economics, Media Economics, and Innovation Economics.

Methodically, the Kaiser chair has a strong empirical orientation, and many of our research projects employ empirical methods. We thus expect our students to have excellent theoretical knowledge in statistics and econometrics and some experience with common software packages for data analysis such as Stata. Furthermore, very strong knowledge in microeconomics is imperative for understanding the problems.

It is also possible that literary thesis themes will be assigned. In this case, we expect you to examine literature on a specific, well-defined thematic area, recapitulate these in your own words, and place the individual papers in the proper context with respect to one another.

Target students

The Chair for Entrepreneurship is particularly interested in students who with like to dig deeper into one of the aforementioned research topics. In general, we expect an exceptionally high effort from our students.

Application Procedure

If you are interested in writing a thesis at the Kaiser chair, please send the following documentation and information to Nicole Ehrsam:

  1. The registration form
  2. A one page letter of motivation.
  3. A transcript which shows the courses you attended and the grades you received.
  4. A short description of the themes which interest you in general. If you have a concrete idea, you are requested to write a one page summary of the proposed thesis topic including the first results of a literature search.
  5. Let us know when you would like to write the thesis.

Please send your information early enough before your planned starting date. Please take note while planning your studies that we might not be able to offer you a theme due to the high number of applications and our limited capacity for supervision.